You can’t have a political movement without moving. But bring your smartphone, too.

People marching in lines. Banners, signs and paraphernalia everywhere. A familiar scene at rallies and protests. At first glance, little beside the intensity has changed since the late nineteenth century when the street first became the stage. Yet, take another look. The seasoned activists march with their chins raised high. The youth, on the other hand, keep their…

The “Grand Unifying Theory” and the case for societal action

Before dawn on a wickedly cold and rainy Thursday morning, fast food workers in black hoodies and t-shirts gathered on a parking lot on Lindell Blvd in St. Louis. They planned to have a peaceful pubic protest to call for a living wage for their labor. Also there: a crowd of people, including me, oft denigrated…

Marching on Washington: Then and now

You’re at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in August, 1963. In November, 1967, you’re on the Mall in Washington petitioning the government to end the war in Vietnam. You feel that by making yourself present in Washington and marching with a sign that cleverly describes your cause, you have the best answer…

Daniel Ellsberg: Edward Snowden was right to leave the U.S.

Snowden did what he did because he recognised the NSA’s surveillance programs for what they are: dangerous, unconstitutional activity. This wholesale invasion of Americans’ and foreign citizens’ privacy does not contribute to our security; it puts in danger the very liberties we’re trying to protect. —Daniel Ellsberg, Guardian 6/10/13 Many people compare Edward Snowden to me…